Academics

Programmes

MTPBA offers master degree program in natural disaster management. Three branches (majors) are offered, namely water-related disaster, earthquake-realted disater, and volcanic-related disaster. It is a four semester (two year) program. The minimum number of credits to complete the study is 42 credit units, including 8 credit units of thesis work.

The degree conferred is Master of Engineering (M.Eng.).

Prospective students are those who have completed undergraduate study in engineering field, such as civil engineering, geology, geomatics, or environmental engineering.

Credit Unit

The credit unit, known as satuan kredit semester or sks in Bahasa Indonesia, account for one hour of lecture, one hour of structured activity, and one hour of individual study, all are scheduled for 16 weeks per semester. One hour activity is equivalent to a 50-minute lecture per week, or a 100-minute seminar per week, or a 170-minute of laboratory or field work per week.

Curricula

Figure below schematically depicts the curricula map of MTPBA.

 

Course Subjects

The total number of credits to complete the study is 42, consisting of 22 credits of compulsory courses, 8 credits of compulsory thesis, and 12 credits of elective courses.

No. Code Course subjects Number of credits Compulsory/
Elective
Semester I
1. TKSC176101 Research Methodology 2 Compulsory
2. TKSC176102 Data Processing Techniques 3 Compulsory
3. TKSC176103 Landslide and Ground Movement 2 Compulsory
4. TKSC176104 Waves and Tsunami 2 Compulsory
5. TKSC176105 Volcanology 2 Compulsory
6. TKSC176106 Applied Hydraulics and Hydrology 3 Compulsory
Semester II
7. TKSC176201 Information System Related to Natural Disaster 2 Compulsory
8. TKSC176202 Natural Disaster Damage and Loss Assessments 3 Compulsory
9. TKSC176203 Flood and Debris Flow 3 Elective, water-related disasters
10. TKSC176204 Flood Early Warning System 3
11. TKSC176205 Drought, Flood, and Debris Flow Disaster Risk Reduction 3
12. TKSC176206 Earthquake Dynamics 3 Elective, earthquake-related disasters
13. TKSC176207 Landslide Early Warning System 3
14. TKSC176208 Earthquake Disaster Risk Reduction 3
15. TKSC176209 Volcanic Eruption and Sedimentology 3 Elective, volcanic-related disasters
16. TKSC176210 Volcanic Disaster Early Warning System 3
17. TKSC176211 Volcanic Disaster Risk Reduction 3
Semester III 
18. TKSC177101 Natural Disaster Quick Response 2 Elective
19. TKSC177102 Community-based Natural Disaster Risk Reduction 2 Elective
20. TKSC177103 Coastal Zone Disaster Management 2 Elective
21. TKSC177104 Application of Hydrologic-Hydraulic Model for Flood Forecasting 3 Elective
22.  TKSC177105 Application of Landslide Prediction Model 2 Elective
23. TKSC177106 Application of Hydraulic Model on Debris Flow Prediction and Control 2 Elective
Semester IV
24. TKSC177201 Field Works 3 Compulsory
25. TKSC177202 Thesis and Publication 8 Compulsory

Sillaby

RESEARCH METODOLOGY (2 credits)

Research processes and steps, signs, terms and condition in research. Research stages and cycles. Procedure of reference searching and schedule settings. Research preparation, research topic selection, research proposal preparation, research report writing, and paper writing.

Action research, problems and case studies, hypotheses, case study design, data processing, optimization methods, result interpretation, research presentation, application of research methodology, introduction to decision support systems. Preparation of thesis research proposals.

References

  1. Hira, D.S., 2008. Operations Research, S. Chand Publishing.
  2. Leedy, P. D., 1997. Practical Research, Planning and Design. Prantice Hall, New Jersey.
  3. Sri Harto Br, 2011. Metodologi Penelitian; Prinsip Penelitian dan Penulisan. Pegangan kulioah.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, and practice.
Assessment methods: assignments and examinations.

DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES (3 credits)

General understanding of statistics, statistical unit, data presentation, probability, random variables, probability distribution, range of beliefs, hypothesis testing, regression and interpolation, correlation, frequency analysis, data generation, time series data analysis, introduction of statistical program software packages and numerical analysis.

Reference

  1. Crewson, P., 2006. Applied Statistics Handbook.
  2. de Smith, M.J., 2014. Statistical Analysis Handbook, a web-based statistics resource. The Winchelsea Press, Winchelsea, UK.
  3. Haan, Charles T., 2002. Statistical Methods in Hydrology, 2ndEd., The Iowa State Univ. Press, Ames, Iowa, USA.
  4. Kottegoda, N.T. and Rosso, R., 2008. Applied Statistics for Civil and Environmental Engineers, ISBN: 978-1-405-17917-1.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, and tutorial / training on statistical program software packages and numerical analysis using data collected from natural disaster phenomena, and exercises.
Assessment methods: quiz, assignments and examinations.

LANDSLIDE AND GROUND MOVEMENT (2 credits)
  • Definition of landslides and land movements,
  • Geological and rock aspects,
  • Earth and tectonic evolution (faults, folds, joints and other structures),
  • geological map,
  • preliminary stages,
  • classification and description of land and rocks in the field of engineering,
  • topography and geology of landslides and their formation process,
  • the influence of ground water,
  • geotechnical investigations in landslide areas,
  • classification and mechanism of soil movement processes,
  • causes of ground motion (control and trigger factors of ground motion),
  • slope stability and rock slope kinematic analysis (stereographic projection),
  • design of landslide prevention techniques,
  • predictions of landslides,
  • method of vulnerability mapping (spatial prediction),
  • introduction to land movement risk reduction,
  • landslide disaster management from social aspect,
  • integrated landslide disaster management.

References

  1. Cornforth, D. H., 2005. Landslide in Practice: Investigation, Analysis, and Remedial/Preventative Options in Soils, John Wiley & Sons.
  2. Hunt, R. E., 2007. Geologic hazards : a field guide for geotechnical engineers, CRC Press Taylor & Francis Group 6000 Broken Sound Parkway NW, ISBN 1‑4200‑5250‑0.
  3. Lee, E. M., 2005. Landslide Risk Assessment, Thomas Telford Ltd.
  4. Nakamura, H. and Higaki, D, 2004. Landslides, Handbook for Master Programme in Natural Disaster Management, GMU.
  5. SNI 03-1962-1990: Tata cara perencanaan penanggulangan longsor dan SKBI-2.3.1987: Lampiran A dan Lampiran B.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, and practice.
Assessment methods: examinations.

WAVES AND TSUNAMI (2 credits)

a. Waves
Linear wave and long wave theory, non linear wave. Long wave length, particle velocity and propagation and deformation. Tsunami wave propagation velocity, tsunami speed, tsunami behavior in various shoreline forms. Long wave forces on building.

b. Tsunami
History of tsunami events in the world and in Indonesia, statistics of tsunami events. Distribution of tsunami prone areas in Indonesia. Run up, run down, reflect, and focus of tsunami waves.

c. Tsunami generation mechanism
Tsunami generation by earthquakes, avalanches and volcanic eruptions. Models and simulations of tsunami wave generation and propagation.

d. Tsunami forces and effects on land
Tsunami force on vertical walls, tsunami force on a pillar, tsunami force in a porous building, tsunami force in a protected building, effectiveness of forest barriers to tsunamis, tsunami force with debris.

e. Tsunami mitigation
The concept of tsunami disaster mitigation (in terms of structure-building, building layout and tsunami safe neighborhood), evacuation routes and evacuation sites, early warning system.

f. Tsunami preparedness
Factors influencing tsunami preparedness, tsunami disaster preparedness development model, tsunami disaster risk calculation.

References

  1. Bozorgnia, Y. and Bertero, V. V., 2004. Earthquake Engineering from Engineering Seismology to Performance – Based Engineering, CRC Press Inc.
  2. CERC, 2006. Coastal Engineering Manual, US Army.
  3. Dean, R. G. and Robert, A.D., 2001. Coastal Processes with Engineering Applications, Cambridge University Press.Triatmadja (2010), Tsunami, Pembangkitan, Penjalaran, Daya rusak dan Mitigasinya, Gadjah Mada University Press.
  4. Gadallah, M. R. and Fisher, R. L., 2004. Applied Seismology, A Comprehensive Guide to Seismic Theory and Application, Pennwell Corp.
  5. Veitch. N., Jaffray.G., 2008. Tsunamis, Causes, Characteristics, Warnings and Protection, Nova.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, tutorial and field visit.
Assessment methods: assignments and examinations.

Volcanology (2 credits)

Definition of volcanoes, spatial distribution of volcanoes. Volcanoes in Indonesia and the world. Tectonics and volcanism, magma formation, physical properties of magma. Volcano seismicity. Eruption classification, effusive and explosive eruption processes and products. Hazard and risk volcanology. Monitoring and mitigation techniques. Control and construction of infrastructure in the volcano area. Sabo system and mix design. Monitoring technique and evacuation mobilization.

References

  1. Institute of Seismological Research, 2008. Earthquake Monitoring and Seismicity Patterns, Department of Science & Technolo.y, Government of Gujarat, Annual Report.
  2. Marty, J., dan Ernst, G., 2005. Volcanoes and The Environment, Cambridge University Press 0521592542.
  3. SNVT Merapi, 2005. Manual on Soil Cement Sabo Dam, Yogyakarta.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, and field visit.
Assessment methods: examinations

Applied Hydrology and Hydraulics (3 credits)

Hydrology and hydraulic analysis are the first steps in planning and operating infrastructure for natural disaster management. Hydrology analysis includes analysis of the elements of the hydrologic cycle and the rainfall-runoff transformation process starting from rainfall data until flood design. The rainfall-runoff transformation analysis includes: rainfall analysis, abstraction analysis / loss / runoff volume, transform analysis of effective rainfall into direct runoff hydrograph using measured and synthetic unit hydrograph method, baseflow and flood routing and flood design analysis.

Understand open channel flow. Use of flow equations in flow analysis through hydraulic buildings, specific energy, momentum and uniform flow. Effect of channel roughness, channel slope, hydraulic building on flow profiles in channels / rivers, non uniform flow. References to this course still use reference points 1. (English version).

References

  1. Rosalina, E.V.N., Sianipar, Y. (Penerjemah), 1992. Hidrolika Saluran Terbuka (Chow, V. T., 1973. Open-channel Hydraulics, McGraw-Hill, New York), Terjemahan Bahasa Indonesia, Erlangga.
  2. Chow, V. T., Maidment, D. R. and Mays, L. W., 2013. Apllied Hydrology, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill.
  3. Mimikou, M.A., Baltas, E.A., Tsihrintzis, V.A., 2016. Hydrology and Water Resources Systems Analysis, CRC Press.
  4. Sri Harto, B., 2000. Hidrologi: Teori, Masalah, Penyelesaian, Nafiri, Yogyakarta.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, and software exercise on hydrological and hydraulic simulation (Easyfit, ANGGREK, HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS).
Assessment methods: examinations

Information System on Natural Disaster (2 credits)

Introduction to disaster information systems. Types of disaster information systems related to each stage of the natural disaster cycle.

Types of basic maps, acquisition, and the understanding (satellite / image maps, topographic maps), basic mapping (implementation and processing techniques), spatial information presentation (types, scale, usage), risk modelling, preparation and presentation of hazard mapping (hazard map) and risk mapping (risk map), and other spatial informations (especially vulnerability map; population density, disaster management infrastructure, public facility, etc). Regional information system (incuding spatial information system and natural resources), e.g. Province and Regency profile,  matery and types of information, relationship between information and disaster management, comprehensive watershed information, potency of identified sectors, master plan for developing various sectors and their integration, information about regional action plans on integrated disaster risk management and GIS application (desktop/Web/Mobile application) on supporting activities before and after disaster (evacuation information system, early warning, disaster risk visualization, damage and losses reporting through web technology).

References

  1. ESRI, 2006. GIS and Emergency Management in Indian Ocean Earthquake/Tsunami Disaster, ESRI, Redlands, CA.
  2. Laituri, M., and Kodrich, K., 2008. On Line Disaster Response Community: People as Sensors of High Magnitude Disasters Internet GIS, Sensors, 8, 3037-3055.
  3. Longley, P. A., Goodchild, M. F., Maguire, D. J., and Rhind, D. W., 2005. Geographic Information Systems and Science, John Wiley & Sons., Sussex.
  4. McDonald, B., and Gordon, P., 2008. United Nations’ Efforts to Strengthen Information Management for Disaster Preparedness and Response, Data Against Natural Disasters, S. Amin and M. Goldstein, eds., World Bank, Washington, 59-82.
  5. Rao, R.R.; Eisenberg, J. and Schmitt, T. (eds)., 2007. Improving Disaster Management: The Role of IT in Mitigation, Preparadness, Response, and Recovery, The National Academic Press, Washington DC.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, exercise, and presentation.
Assessment methods: assignments and examinations

Assessment of Damage and Loss in Natural Disaster (3 credits)

Vulnerability and susceptibility is the main factor on risk level assessment of a building towards natural disaster, hazard level, rapid visual screening of vulnerability and susceptibility and detail evaluation. Components of infrastructure and application of vulnerability and susceptibility analysis for both visual screening and detail evaluation by using available guidelines.

References

  1. FEMA-154, 2002, Rapid Visual Screening of Building for Potential Seismic Hazards: A Handbook, Second Edition, Applied Technology Council, 555 Twin Dolpin Drive, Suite 550 Redwood City, California 94065.
  2. FEMA-310, 1998. Handbook for the Seismic Evaluation of Buildings, Federal Emergency Management Agency, USA.
  3. IBRD, 2010. Damage, Loss and Needs Assessment, Guidance Notes Vol. 1, 2, 3.
  4. Kelly, T. E., 2001. Performance Based Evaluation of Buildings, Reference Manual Holmes Consulting Group, Ltd.
  5. Perka BNPB Nomor 15 Tahun 2011 Tentang Pedoman Pengkajian Kebutuhan Pasca Bencana.
  6. Robinson, J., Phillips, W., 2014. Assessment of strategies for linking the damage and loss assessment methodology to the post-disaster needs assessment, UN-ECLAC.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, exercise, and field visit trying to evaluate infrastructure by using rapid visual screening method.

Assessment methods: quiz, assignments and examinations

A.  COMPULSORY COURSES – WATER DISASTER TOPIC

1. FLOOD AND DEBRIS FLOW (3 CREDITS)

Understanding of process and perception of stakeholders related to flood. Basic principal of integrated flood management, conventional flood control, comprehensive-multisector of structural and non-structural flood measures. Flood monitoring, flood management, flood risk, flood modelling, flood forecasting and early warning system, flood mapping by GIS, institutional aspects, evaluation and analisys, software application (HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, FDA).

Type, magnitude, and location of sediment, sediment transport mechanism, positif and negatif impact of sediment supply phenomenon,  Sabo Dam, legal aspect of sediment mitigation and utilization, strategies and operational of integrated sediment mitigation, community development about activities related to land use and river resources management, river quality management, practice of sediment transport monitoring and evaluation both naturally and due to human intervention, analysis or river sediment balance based on mass konservation concept.

Hydrodynamic of sedimentary liquid, properties of sediment material, debris-flow initial motion, transpor mechanism, bed-load, suspended-load, total-load, stable channel, scour, sediment measurement, dam sedimentation, debris-flow types, debris flow distribution, debris flow deposit, degradation and agradation, debris-flow transport, rough material movement, structures of debris-flow wave, debris flow prediction, disaster prevention due to debris-flow, flood control due to debris-flow, sediment balance, monitoring system and data acquition of debris flow, and flood monitoring.

References:

  1. Anonim, 2007. Pedoman Penanggulangan Bencana Banjir, BAKORNAS PB, Jakarta.
  2. ASTM, 2002. Erosion and Sediment Control Technology Standard, ASTM Standard.
  3. Carlos E.M. Tucci, 2007. Urban Flood Management, Cap-Net.
  4. Kourgialas, N.N., KaratZas, G.P., Flood management and a GIS modelling method to assess flood-hazard areas—a case study, 2011, Hydrological Sciences Journal, Vol. 56 – Issue 2, Taylor & Francis On-line.
  5. Nakatani, K., Wada, T., Matsumoto, N., Satofuka, Y., Mizuyama, T., 2011. Development and Application of GUI Equipped 1-D And 2-D Debris Flow Simulator, Applied to Mixed-Size Grains, Padua, Italy. Proc. of 5th International Conference on Debris-Flow Hazards Mitigation: Mechanics, Prediction and Assessment, pp. 735-744.
  6. Stancalie, G, Alecu, C., Catana, S., 2000. Flood Hazard Assessment and Monitoring using Geographic Information, Remotely Sensed Data, International Archives of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Vol. XXXIII, Part B7, Amsterdam.
  7. Takahashi, T, 2007. Debris Flow, Mechanics, Prediction and Countermeasures, Taylor & Francis.

Learning methods: classical (face to face),tutorial,  discussion, exercise, and field visit.
Assessment methods: Assigenments and case studies of floods and lava flows by using rainfall-runoff models and hydraulic models that are suitable for lava flow analysis, exams.

 2. FLOOD EARLY WARNING SYSTEM (3 CREDITS)

Flood early warning system development concept, vulnerable system, flood risk (inundation, errotion, levee break), flood disaster prediction, flood parameter, mitigation action, early warning system objective, early warning system instrumentation, method and instrument of early warning system, censor typical, transformation and distribution system of flood early warning system information, urban drainage system and flood area, example of development, application and evaluation result of early warning system: Code and Bengawan Solo River Basin.

References:

  1. Adiel, P.W., 2014. Pembuatan Perangkat Lunak Untuk Mendukung Pengendalian Banjir DAS Bengawan Solo Hulu. Tesis Program Magister Pengelolaan Bencana Alam UGM, Yogyakarta.Zschau, J. and Kuppers, A.N., 2003. Early Warning Systems for Natural Disaster Reduction, Springer-Verlag Heidelberg New York.
  2. Australian Emergency Manual Series Manual 21, 2009. Flood Warning.
  3. Feldman, A.D., 2000. Technical Reference Manual of Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS. HQ US Army Corps of Engineers, Washington DC.
  4. Gemala Suzanti, 2011. SOP Penanganan Banjir Wilayah Sungai Bengawan Solo.
  5. ISDR Platform for The Promotion of Early Warning, 2006.
  6. Nayak, S. and Zlatanova, S., 2008. Remote Sensing and GIS Technologies for Monitoring and Prediction of Disasters, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
  7. Scharffenberg, W.A., 2013. Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS: User’s Manual, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, HEC, Davis, CA.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), tutorial, discussion, exercise, and field study.
Assessment methods:quiz, assignment, exams.

3. DROUGHT, FLOOD, AND DEBRIS FLOW RISK MITIGATION (3 CREDITS)

Characteristic, caused, risk and impact of drought disaster, flood and debris flow. Analysis of drought index/magnitude assesment. Structural and non-structural mitigation plan of drought, flood disaster and debris flow (contingency plan, organization-constitutional-coordination and action plan).

References

  1. Buku Teknik Sabo, Ditjen SDA, 2011, Jakarta.
  2. Donald W. Knight, Assad Y. Shamseldin, 2005. River Basin Modelling for Flood Risk Mitigation, Taylor & Francis Group, Singapore.
  3. Giuseppe Rossi, Theodoro Vega, Brunella Bonaccorso, 2007. Methods and Tools for Drought Analysis and Management, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherland.
  4. Pedoman Penanggulangan Banjir, 2007, Bakornas Penanggulangan Bencana, Jakarta.
  5. Peraturan Kepala BNPB Noor 4 Tahun 2008 Tentang Pedoman Penyusunan Rencana Penanggulangan Bencana.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, exercise, and field study.
Assessment methods: assignment, exams.

4. APPLICATION OF HYDROLOGY-HYDRAULICS MODEL ON FLOOD FORECASTING AND ANALYSIS (3 CREDITS)

Application of Hydrological software, water characteristic, rainfall and runoff process, applied hydrology model simulation (HEC-HMS, HEC-GeoHMS, WMS) for flood, continues flow and drought, plan, operation, strategic and drought measurement. Application of Hydraulic software (HEC-RAS, HEC-GeoRAS, SMS) for flood modelling on river channel, spillway dam sluice gate control, urban drainage system for flood control, polder.

References

  1. Adrien, 2004, Computational Hydraulics and Hydrology, CRC Press.
  2. Saeid Eslamean, 2014, Handbook of Engineering Hydrology, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group Singh, V. P., 1995, Computer Models of Watershed Hydrology, Water Resources Publications.
  3. Scharffenberg, W.A., 2013, Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS: User’s Manual, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, HEC, Davis, CA.
  4. Scharffenberg, W.A dan Fleming, M.J., 2010, Hydrologic Modeling System, HEC-HMS, User’s Manual Version 3.5, US Army Corps of Engineers, Hydrologic Engineering Center, Davis, CA.
  5. Sujono, J., 2014, Petunjuk Singkat Aplikasi HEC-HMS, Departemen Teknik Sipil dan Lingkungan FT UGM.
  6. USACE, 2016, HEC-RAS User’s Manual, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Institute for Water Resources, Hydraulic Engineering Center, Davis, USA.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, tutorial, and exercise.
Assessment methods: assignment, exams.

B.   COMPULSORY COURSES – EARTHQUAKE TOPIC

1. EARTHQUAKE DYNAMIC (3 CREDITS)

Earthquake definition, earthquake intensity, magnitude, seismicity, atenuation, earthquake-zone. Earthquake mechanism, tectonic-plate theory, earthquake centre distribution. Seismic waves, type of seismic waves. Reflection and refraction of earthquake waves. Ground vibrations: ground-vibrations theory, soil-structure interaction. Earthquake magnitude,  seismic wave distribution, seismic wave acceleration, velocity and energy of seismic waves. Earthquakes in the world and in indonesia, earthquake zone worldwide and in Indonesia, earthquake history, impact, and measurement. Building structural vibration, impact of ground acceleration to the building. Earthquake disaster mapping, failure due to earthquake, evaluation of level and failure type, distribution and area, definition of earthquake scale and the interpretation. Liquifaction theory and structural strengthening and retrofitting to liquifaction.

Design concept of earthquake-resistant structure, dynamic structure response, introduction to material characteristic, strength, stiffness, and dactility, caused and impact of earthquake to the structure, type of buildings structural system (bearing & shear wall, rigid fram, F+SW), concept earthquake-resistant building (concept of “strong colum-weak beam”, soft-story, short column effect, tortion, mechanism of structural failure), failure and caused of buidling collapse due to earthquake, non-engineered structures and engineered structures building, structure dactility for earthquke-resistant building, strengthening and retrofitting of building collapse due to earthquake.

References

  1. Chen, W. F. and Scawthorn, C., 2002. Earthquake Engineering Handbook (New Directions in Civil Engineering), CRC Press Inc.
  2. Chen, W. F., 2005. Earthquake Engineering for Structural Design, CRC Press Inc.
  3. Departemen PU, 2002. Standar Perencanaan Ketahanan Gempa untuk Struktur Bangunan Gedung SNI-1726, Dep. PU.
  4. Stein, S. And Wysession, M., 2003. An Introduction to Seismology, Earthquake, and Earth Structure, Black Well Publishing.
  5. William, H.K.L., Kanamori, H., Jennings, P.C., and Kisslinger, C., 2002, International Handbook of Earthquake and Engineering Seismology, Part A, Academic Press, London, UK.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, tutorial, exercise, and field study.

Assessment methods: assignment and exams.

2. LANDSLIDE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM (3 CREDITS)

Introduction to risk reduction of land slide which includes technically effort and management (prediction and prevention, monitoring system, early warning system and data acquisition, and slope stability improvement), landslide and ground movement monitoring technology, monitoring design and landslide early warning on ground movement types, warning criteria (impact of geomorphology, rainfall,, groundwater fluctuation, geology-geotechnic condition to the landslide initiation), hazard mapping and prediction of landslide disaster, monitoring system and data acquisition for lanslide and ground movement.

References:

  1. Cornforth, D. H., 2005. Landslide in Practice: Investigation, Analysis, and Remedial/Preventative Options in Soils, John Wiley & Sons.
  2. Lee, E. M., 2005. Landslide Risk Assessment, Thomas Telford Ltd.
  3. Nakamura, H. and Higaki, D, 2004. Landslides, Handbook for Master Programme in Natural Disaster Management, GMU.
  4. Sassa, K. and Canuti, P, 2008. Landslides: disaster risk reduction, Springer.

Learning methods: classical (face to face).
Assessment methods: exams.

3. EARTHQUAKE RISK MITIGATION (3 CREDITS)

Many infrastructure failure and fatalities have been caused by earthquake disaster. The history of earthquake disasters in Indonesia and in the worldwide could become lesson learnt for risk mitigation of earthquake disaster in the future. Disaster risk could be explained by threat and vulnerability. Earthquake mitigation processes could be done by understanding these two factor. Basically, every disaster have lifecycle that is divided into four step; disaster reduction, preparedness, emergency response, and rehabilitation and reconstruction. Success of earthquake disaster mitigation program depends on application process of every program in every step.

References

  1. BNPB, 2008. Peraturan Kepala Badan Nasional Penanggulangan Bencana Nomer 4 Tahun 2008 Tentang Pedoman Penyusunan Rencana Penanggulangan Bencana, Badan Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB).
  2. Chen, W. F. and Scawthorn, C., 2002. Earthquake Engineering Handbook (New Directions in Civil Engineering), CRC Press Inc.
  3. FEMA 172, 1992. NEHRP Handbook of Techniques for the Seismic Rehabilitation of Existing building, Building Seismic.
  4. FEMA 310, 1998. Handbook for the Seismic Evaluation of Buildings, Federal Emergency Management Agency, USA.
  5. FEMA 154, 2002. Rapid Visual Screening of Building for Potential Seismic Hazards: A Handbook, Second Edition, Applied Technology Council, 555 Twin Dolpin Drive, Suite 550 Redwood City, California 94065.
  6. Hunt, R.E., 2007, Geologic Hazard: A Field Guide for Geotechnical Engineers, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group.
  7. SNI-1726, 2002. Standar Perencanaan Ketahanan Gempa untuk Struktur Bangunan Gedung SNI-1726, Dep. PU.
  8. Wyss, M. and Snroder, J.F., 2014, Earthquake Hazard, Risk, and Disasters, Elesevier Inc. USA.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), discussion, presentation
Assessment methods: assignment and exams.

4. APPLICATION OF LANDSLIDE AND GROUND MOVEMENT MODEL SOFTWARE (2 CREDITS)

Review of some landslide and ground movement events, analysis and assessment of soila and rock slope stability (2D and 3D). landslide prediction method and ground movement.

References

  1. Abramson, L. W., Lee, T. S., Sharma, S., and Boyce, G. M., 2002, Slope Stability and Stabilization Method, 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons.
  2. Cornforth, D. H., 2005, Landslide in Practice: Investigation, Analysis, and Remedial/Preventative Options in Soils, John Wiley & Sons.
  3. Krahn, J., 2004, Stability Modeling with SLOPE/W,GEO-SLOPE/W International Ltd.
  4. Lee, E. M., 2005, Landslide Risk Assessment, Thomas Telford Ltd.
  5. Nakamura, H. and Higaki, D, 2004, Landslides, Handbook for Master Programme in Natural Disaster Management, GMU.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), tutorial, excercise
Assessment methods: assignment and exams.

C.   COMPULSORY COURSES – vOLCANIC TOPIC

1. VOLCANIC ERUPTION AND SEDIMENTOLOGY (3 CREDITS)

Volcanic eruption and deposit forming around it, I of eruption activity to hydrothermal phenomennon or air heating around also initial flora and fauna life, volcanic material influence toward formation of field surface around, volcanic material production and industry, volcano and economic benefit, deposit variability and influence of social and culture people around it.

References

  1. Institute of Seismological Research, 2008. Earthquake Monitoring and Seismicity Patterns, Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Annual Report.
  2. Marty, J., dan Ernst, G., 2005. Volcanoes and The Environment, Cambridge University Press 0521592542.

Assessment method: Practice

Tutorial and workshop

2. VOLCANIC DISASTER EARLY WARNING SYSTEM (3 CREDITS)

Magma movement indentification, tectonic activity, summit surface deformation and lava dome forming, pyroclastic heap stability, material rainfall phenomenon (rock, sand and volcanic ash), volcanic material characteristic, volcanic material mechanism migration, eruption coloumn dynamic (magma pipe forming, growth and magma filling), basaltic flow dynamic characteristic, volcanic processes model on earth, interaction between volcanic and techtonic phenomenon.

Related research topic: consequences of volcanic activity and spatial-temporal activity of the volcanic system also the aplication to the risk handling and model of infrastructure response, physical proces related to the basaltic material behaviour (pyroclastic cloud formation, material rainfall, etc), eruption modelling.

References

  1. Early Warning Sub-committee of the IMC ICDR Govt. of Japan, 2006. Japan’s Natural Disaster Early Warning Systems and International Cooperative Effort.
  2. Lopes, R., 2005. The Volcano Adventure Guide, Cambidge University Press.
  3. Van Geffen, J., van Roozendael, M., di Nicolantonio, W., Tampellini, L., Valks, P., Erbetseder, Th., and van der A, R., 2007. Monitoring of Volcanic Activity from Satellite as Part of GSE Promote, Proceedings of the ENVISAT Symposium, 23–27 April 2007, Montreux, Switserland, ESA publication SP-636.
  4. http://www.geology.buffalo.edu/research/volcanostudies.shtml#1

Assessment method: Practice

Tutorial and workshop

3. VOLCANIC DISASTER RISK MITIGATION (3 CREDITS)

Magma movement indentification, tectonic activity, summit surface deformation and lava dome forming, pyroclastic heap stability, material rainfall phenomenon (rock, sand and volcanic ash),vulcanic material characteristic, vulcanic material mechanism migration, eruption coloumn dynamic (magma pipe forming, growth and magma filling), basaltic flow dynamic characteristic, volcanic processes model on earth.

References

  1. Conway, A., 2013, Hazard: The Extinction Protocol Guide to Risk Mitigation, Lulu Publishing, Morrisville.
  2. Dietr Rickenmann and Cheng-ling Chen, 2003. Debris Flow Hazard Mitigation: Mechanism, Prediction, and Assessment, Vol. 1, Millpress Rotterdam Netherlands.
  3. Wang, F., Miyajima, M., Li. T., Shan, W., and Fathani, T.F., 2012, Progress of Geo-Disaster Mitigation Technology in Asia, Springer Science & Business Media.
  4. Tassi, F., Vaselli, O., and Caselli A.T., 2015, Copahue Volcano, Springer.

Assessment method: Practice

Tutorial and workshop

4. PYROCLASTIC FLOW MODEL (2 CREDITS)

Pyroclastic flow hydraulic concept, pyroclastic flow dynamic equation development, pyroclastic flow model.

References

  1. Branney, M.J. and Kokelaar, B.P., 2002, Pyroclastic Density Currents and The Sedimentation of Ignimbrites, Geological Society of London.
  2. Dietr Rickenmann and Cheng-ling Chen, 2003. Debris Flow Hazard Mitigation: Mechanism, Prediction, and Assessment, Vol. 1, Millpress Rotterdam Netherlands.
  3. Fagents, S.A., Gregg, T.K.P., and Lopes, R.M.C., 2013, Modeling Volcanic Processes: The Physics and Mathematics of Volcanism, Cambridge University Press.

Assessment method: Practice

Tutorial and workshop

D.  OPTIONAL COURSES

1. NATURAL DISASTER EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (2 CREDITS)

Coordination and comunication technique among instantions, evacuation hierarchy and early warning facillities, applied decission support system (PiC, Key person and group leader), refugees management (logistic, health, and information flow), applied decision support system.

References

  1. Anonim, 2008. Standar Sistem Manajemen Keadaan Darurat, Panduan Instruktur, Kepolisian Republik Indonesia, Departemen Luar Negeri A.S., Departemen Kehakiman A.S., International Criminal Investigative Training Assistance Program (ICITAP), Jakarta.
  2. Brassard, C., Giles, D.W., and Howitt, A.M., 2014, Natural Disaster Management in the Asia-Pacific: Policy and Governance, Springer.
  3. Collins, L.R., 2000, Disaster Management and Preparedness, CRC Press.
  4. Farazmand, A., 2001, Handbook of Crisis and Emergency Management, CRC Press.
  5. Pinkowski, J., 2008, Disaster Management Handbook, CRC Press.

Practice work

Workshop on Standard System Management of Emergency for Disaster Management

2. DISASTER RISK MITIGATION COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BASE (2 CREDITS)

Community development and empowerment in water and disaster management, collective authority policy, social problem resolve trough organizational, authority and community development, encouraging and defending community activity, social action model, social product model, community modernization, community management, community education (informal education), community awareness and willingness building, community confidence and participation building. Develop new tradition: living harmony with natural disaster/environment, planning and strategy on natural disaster anticipation.

Students are provided with knowledge and practice to have ability to educate community through community development and/or writing ability on the public media mass related to disaster mitigation.

References

  1. Davis, I., 2014, Disaster Risk Management in Asia and the Pacific, Routledge.
  2. Herbert J. Rubin, 2000. Community Organizing and Development, Allyn&Bacon.
  3. Ledwith, M., 2005. Community Development: A Critical Approach, Policy Pr.
  4. Shaw, R., 2012, Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction, Emerald Group Publishing.

Assessment method: Practice

Tutorial and workshop

3. INTEGRATED COASTAL AREA ON DISASTER MANAGEMENT (2 CREDITS)

1. Introduction
Coastal area definition, and coastal area disaster, wind wave theory and tidal wave, coastal currents, sediment transport, errotion, accretion and abration, pollutants difusion (oil, sediment, urban waste, etc), wind set up, wave set up.

2. Coastal area management
Definition of coastal management, protection and development, reclamation, dredging and its impact.
Coastal management concept, coastal management aspect. Case study (Jakarta Giant Sea Wall). Tsunami, sea level and tropical storm, natural defense damage (bakau, dunes) and conservation, early warning system, Public Work mitigation plan.

3. Erosion, Abration, Accretion
Erosion, abration, accretion protection
Wave protection,
Silting estuary
Appropriate solution

4. Inundation (Rob)
Protection from estuary flood
Protection from Sea Level Rise (SLR)

5. Environment
Wave and tides prediction by using software, protection form pollution and damage to the coastal environment, protection from negative impact of coastal development, protection from sea water intrusion.

6. Tsunami and tides near the coastal
Protection from tsunami and tides near the coastal.

References

  1. Beatley. T., Brower. D.J., Schawab. A.K., 2002. An Introduction to Coastal Zone Management, 2nd Edition, Island Press.
  2. CERC, 2006. Coastal Engineering Manual, US Army
  3. Dean, R. G. and Robert, A.D., 2001. Coastal Processes with Engineering Applications, Cambridge University Press.
  4. Reeve, C., 2004. Coastal Engineering: Processes, Theory and Design Practice, Taylor & Francis.
  5. Zimmermann, Dean.R.G., Penchev. V., Verhagen. H.J., 2004. Environmentally Friendly Coastal Protection, Springer.

Learning methods: classical (face to face), tutorial, exercise, and field study
Assessment methods: assignment, presentation and exams.

E. FIELD TRAINING, THESIS AND PUBLICATION (COMPULSORY)

1. FIELD TRAINING (3 CREDITS)

Introduction of policy definition and questionnaire preparation. Multi variable analysis, qualification analysis, regression analysis. Field study case object is decided before, splitted into several groups, field understading, field investigation, related to grand road map research, integrated report preparedness which is presentated in seminar or workshop forum.

Students are expected to learn by doing in some of the institution that is related to disaster, e.g. construction company, consultant, and government institution.

The position in which the student work should be as assisstent manager or decision maker level related to disaster or technical officer responsible for designing and analyzing complex work.

Students are expected to learn from the experient of solving the problems by some consideration based on scientific analysis and includes all aspects encountered in the field.

Field training should be done equal to 3 credits or about 4 working hours during 30 working days.

2. THESIS (8 CREDITS)

Giving provision to students on reviewing academic experience like action research related to natural disaster which is oriented to comprehensive problem solving. Emphasizing in case study with analysis procedure and structural and systematic review with theory provision which is gained during lectures. Metodology development in thesis research action can be laboratory facillities utillizing for physically model or indoor model (indoor laboratory or outdoor laboratory works) mathematic (software application oriented) or field survey, depends on interest and topics which already decided with advisor.

Marks

There are ten grades or marks.

Marks Weights
A 4
A− 3.75
A/B 3.5
B+ 3.25
B 3
B− 2.75
B/C 2.5
C+ 2.25
C 2
D (Fail) 0

Rules and Procedures

Complete description of the Rules and Procedures is available in Bahasa Indonesia.
Its English version is still under construction.
Click here to go to the Bahasa Indonesia version.

Academic Calendar

The academic calender starts in August and ends in June. Term breaks are from the third week of December to the third week of January and from the third week of June to end of July.

The following diagram depicts the academic cycle. G indicates the Graduation Day. There are four graduation days in an academic year, that is in October, January, April, and June.

 

Lectures of every course subject are delivered in 16 weeks in a semester, comprising of 14 weeks of lectures, 1 week of mid-semester examination, and 1 week of final examination. Thus, the schedule is arranged as follow:

  • lectures: 1st to 7th weeks
  • mid-semester examination: 8th week
  • lectures: 9th to 15th weeks
  • final examination: 16th week

The academic calendar is fixed by Rector’s decree every year. Please visit the Announcement category on the Home page to see the current academic. Course schedule of the current semester is also available on the Announcement category.

Thesis

List of completed thesis works with abstracts is available in Bahasa Indonesia. Visit the Akademika page.